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LMU welcomes Japanese students

21 Mar

LMU-Kanto Program Director Curtis Klinghoffer greets the Kanto International High School Students during orientation on Tuesday.

The long journey was complete Monday night as 57 students and two teachers from Kanto International Senior High School in Tokyo, Japan, arrived at Lincoln Memorial University. The group was met by LMU’s Kanto Program Director Curtis Klinghoffer, Assistant Director JoAnn Russell and a handful of residential life staff members to help move them into the rooms that will be their home for the next seven weeks.The English immersion program began in earnest on Tuesday morning with orientation. LMU President Dr. B. James Dawson, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Evelyn Smith, Dean of Students Frank E. Smith and Director of Housing Leslie Chumley were among the administration to greet the students during orientation. In addition to the well wishes from LMU brass, the students were introduced to their instructors, received their class schedules, went on a campus tour and were issued IDs. After lunch in the LMU dining hall, the students were given the afternoon to explore campus and get acquainted with the area. Several found their way to the LMU softball game for their first truly American experience.

Kanto Instructor Kathy Francisco gives a group of Kanto students a campus tour during orientation.

Students have come annually to LMU from the Kanto International Senior High School since the LMU-Kanto Program began in 1979. This group of 57 students will spend the next six weeks engaging in rigorous, immersive English studies and an extracurricular cultural program that exposes them to the richness of the culture of the Appalachian region. In addition, the group will take a three-day excursion to Washington, D.C. The students also make home stays with host families.

The home stay involves a family welcoming a Kanto student into their home for a weekend. The encounter begins with the family picking the student up Friday evening. The student must be back to campus some time on Sunday. The LMU-Kanto Program is still looking for families to host students this spring. Russell, who coordinates the home stays, says the students are looking for anything more than a look at a typical weekend at home. “They really want to see what is like to live in an American home. They aren’t looking for any big exciting side trip or anything. They are here to learn English and experience our culture.”

As much as the students gain from this experience, the benefits are reciprocal: the entire LMU community is enriched by the presence of these Japanese students who teach about their own customs and traditions.

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I am a…

19 Mar

Last year, LMU rolled out three new television spots. The 30 second spots were aimed at promoting the Caylor School of Nursing, the Carter and Moyers School of Education and the DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine. They were the first in a series that will ultimately include a total of eight spots on LMU and its individual schools and programs. The spots are written by Senior Director of Marketing and Public Relations Kate Reagan and produced in conjunction with WBIR-TV in Knoxville where they will also air. WBIR’s Michael Wiseman directed and produced the two of the four current spots. This week, LMU unveiling the next installment…

I Am a Lawyer.

Lincoln Memorial University 2012 Law Program from Michael Wiseman on Vimeo.

A close call, close to home.

11 Mar

If you have ever visited Kresge Hall or been to a University Advancement event, then likely you know who Angela Jordan is. If not, you are missing out. This remarkable woman puts all of us at UA first. She never ceases to lend a hand, help out or just listen to whatever may be on your mind. Her official title is administrative assistant to the vice president for University Advancement, but she really does so much more than assist for our entire division. More than just an assistant, Angie mothers us all.

No matter how many times she has been recipient of one of my eye rolls when she fusses at me for carrying too much, she still cares enough to chastise me any time I lift more than I should. She often tells me that she doesn’t care if I think I can do it, she knows that I shouldn’t. There is never a day that I leave work without her telling me do drive safe and take care.

When the devastating storms hit Harrogate on Friday, March 2, 2012, Angie’s house was struck by one of the tornados that ravaged neighborhoods across the street from LMU. She and her husband were thankfully unharmed, but the house and property sustained much damage. Angie asked me to help her thank the community who came to her aid. She said that she felt a thank you card wasn’t enough and wondered if I would print something in our University newsletter, CampusLinc, which I assured her I would. I also encouraged her to share with me her story and the following is just that…

 

LMU Dances into Basketball season

16 Oct

 

Homecoming hit a fever pitch with Midnight Madness on Friday. It was a chance for the ‘Splitters Nation to get to know the 2011-2012 Lady Railsplitter and Railsplitter Basketball teams. Plus there were some great performances by the LMU Dance Team, Cheerleaders and Abe. We even crowned a new Homecoming Queen and King! Not to mention a halarious dizzy bat contest and a wicked simon says game. Oh what a night!

 

Homecoming has arrived!

14 Oct

It’s a crisp October day. The sun is out, leaves are blowing around and LMU is busseling with activity. It can only mean one thing, homecoming has arrived. Droves of alumni and friends are coming home to reconnect and reflect on their glory years. There is a full weekend of activities and fun. Be sure to check back here often for highlights, photos and videos!

The weekend got off to a fun start with the Donor Recognition Reception on Thursday. Check out the slide show below for all the fun.
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Pets and Vets need Techs

12 Oct

When I was a young girl I had the best dog. Daisy was a black lab who would meet me at the end of my street every day on my walk home from school. Some of my happiest memories include Daisy. Unfortunately, some of my saddest memories from childhood came when Daisy was stricken with cancer and our family had to put her down.

Over twenty years later, I still remember sitting in the veterinarian’s waiting room not really understanding what was going on. I remember my dad going back with the vet and my older brother and I sitting in the waiting room crying. That day, a veterinary technician sat with us until our dad came back. She explained what was going on and how much pain Daisy had been in because of the cancer.

At the time, like a lot of people, I had no idea what a veterinary technician was. I just knew that the nice lady at the vet’s office made a horrible day a little easier. I would bet that most people can tell you the name of at least one veterinarian whether they own pets or not. I’d also bet that they couldn’t tell you what a vet tech does, let alone the name of a veterinary technician.

Like medical, vision, dental and other health care providers, veterinary care requires a team to give pets the best medical care possible. Veterinary technicians are educated in the latest medical advances and skilled at working alongside veterinarians. They work closely with veterinarians, veterinary assistants, practice managers, patients and owners to provide the essential link with all involved in the care process.

This week the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America, Inc. (NAVTA) is celebrating the profession with National Veterinary Technician Week. This annual event recognizes veterinary technicians for their contributions in pet health care, as well as veterinarians, assistants, practice managers and others involved in this care. This year’s theme is “Pets and Vets need Techs.”

LMU is proud to be home to just one of three Veterinary Technician programs in the state of Tennessee. Founded in 1985, the program’s goal is to meet the increasing demand for veterinary technicians in the region. The program is accredited by the American Veterinary Medicine Association. It also continues to grow, with a second Veterinary Technician program starting at LMU’s Kingsport Extended Learning site in Kingsport in January.

In addition to joining the nation to celebrate NAVTA’s National Veterinary Technician Week, LMU’s Veterinary Technician program is also sponsoring two high profile events in the coming weeks to raise awareness of the profession and LMU’s program.

The Fall Veterinary Technician Continuing Education Conference will be held on Friday, October 21, 2011, at the Schenck Center for Allied Health Sciences on the LMU Main Campus in Harrogate, Tenn. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m., with the conference beginning at 9 a.m. Six Continuing Education (CE) credits will be available through this conference. Cost for attending the conference is $25, and lunch will be provided. Those wishing to attend the conference should RSVP to Amy Nelson at 423.869.6205 or amy.nelson@lmunet.edu.

The annual Veterinary Technology Dog Show will take place on Saturday, November 5, at Haymaker Farms in Harrogate, Tenn. Registration for entries into the dog show begins at 11:30 a.m., with the dog show to commence at 1 p.m. The entry fee is $5 for the first class and $2 for all subsequent classes. Classes include: costume class, saddest dog, happiest dog, junior handler, senior dog, obedience, senior handler, best puppy, best mixed breed, best hound, best herding, best toy breed, best terrier, best sporting, best non-sporting, best working and best trick. All dogs must be on a leash and puppies must be 12 weeks old or older. All dogs must be vaccinated. For more information, contact Director of Veterinary Technology Mary Hatfield at 423.869.6278.

NAVTA is a nonprofit organization that represents and promotes the veterinary technician profession. NAVTA provides direction, education, support and coordination for its members. Incorporated in 1981, NAVTA is the national organization devoted exclusively to developing and enhancing the profession of veterinary technology. Pets give us unconditional love and veterinary technicians give us peace of mind. For this reason, they should be celebrated during National Veterinary Technician Week. More information about NAVTA and this special week can be found at http://www.navta.net or by calling 888.99NAVTA.

Did you know, DCOM is not LMU’s first medical school?

4 Oct

It’s been about six years since LMU first announced its plans to pursue what is know the LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine.  I still remember one of the most interesting tidbits about the University that was unearthed in the planning for the announcement was the historical timeline for the first medical school run by LMU.

I was reminded of that history recently, when Oliver Springs native Dean Ford contacted me. Ford, who had no connection to LMU, purchased a lot of frames at an auction years ago. He said he assumed they were all blank and never went through them all. When he finally did, years later, he found a large diploma from the Medical College of Lincoln Memorial University for one Dr. Stanley Nease. The diploma was dated 1915, which would make it one of the last class years to graduate from the Medical College of Lincoln Memorial University.

The Medical Department of LMU in Knoxville, Tenn. circa 1905.

The school  dates back even earlier than LMU as it was founded in 1889 as the Tennessee Medical College. It was a private medical college located in Knoxville, Tenn. It was one of 133 medical schools in operation in the United States by 1890. Following a period of time, the school fell on hard times financially and started looking to align itself with larger schools. TMC approached LMU with an articulation agreement to make TMC the Medical Department of LMU in 1905. A contract was affirmed and ratified in 1906. By 1909, TMC was sold to LMU and became the Medical College of LMU.

The Operating room of Lincoln Memorial Hospital.

The financial troubles continued and by 1914, LMU’s board arranged for the sale of the school building and associated hospital. It concluded operation at the end of the school year and made arrangements for its students to complete their coursework elsewhere. Dr. Nease was among those who completed their degrees after the school was shuttered. Included in the back of the frame Ford found was a letter from the University of Tennessee certifying that Nease had in fact completed his studies.

Dean Ford presents Stanley Nease's diploma to Senior Director of Marketing and Public Relations Kate Reagan.

After his discovery, Ford tried to find a living relative of Dr. Nease to give the diploma to. After a exhaustive search, he contacted his friend John Rice Irwin, the founder of the Museum of Appalachia, to see if he would be interested in adding the diploma to the museum’s collection. Irwin, a longtime friend of LMU, referred Ford to the University and last week I met him at the LMU-Cedar Bluff Extended Learning Site. He generously gave LMU the diploma, which is nearing 100 years old. It had been damaged by water and time.

 I turned the Nease diploma over to University Archivist Michelle Ganz. She indicated that the document was likely beyond repair for display, but it was still an important piece of LMU history that would be saved in our collection. When she returned to the archives she discovered that our collection already boasted several duplicate diplomas or diplomas that were never picked up from the Medical College at LMU from that time period.

My newest project will be to take one or two from the archives and prepare them for exhibit at LMU-DCOM. On the heels of the Inaugural Class graduation in May, I think it would be great to display one of the first LMU-DCOM diplomas alongside one of the last Medical College at LMU diplomas.