Tag Archives: Alumni Services

Where do campus buildings get their names?

29 Aug

What’s in a name?

IMG_3064            If you have been in The Village on LMU’s campus in the past week, you have probably noticed a change.  The two newest residence halls, formerly referred to as DB3 and DB4, now have names.  Many students are aware that the other residence halls in The Village are either named after alumni donors (Shelton and Langley) or former university presidents (Burchett and McClelland).  Now that DB3 and DB4 have been named, there is a great deal of curiosity surrounding the origination of these names. However, there is no real mystery here as these two are also named for donors and a former president.IMG_3061

Norton Hall, formerly known as DB3, is named after a residence hall that once stood near the main entrance of campus, across from LP Hall.  The original Norton Hall was built in 1912. The construction was made possible through a generous contribution from Mary and Ella Norton of Norwich, Connecticut. The sisters honored their father’s lifelong commitment to philanthropy through their support of LMU and many other organizations. Many LMU alumni made great memories in this dorm, as it also contained a kitchen and dining hall.  In 1923 and 1924, Norton Hall served as an infirmary during a typhoid epidemic.  Now, many more memories will be made in the new Norton Hall.

 

Dr. Martin Peters participating in commencement exercises.

Dr. Martin Peters participating in commencement exercises.

DB4 is now named Peters Hall after Dr. Ralph Martin Peters and his wife, Lorraine Daniel Peters.  Dr. Peters completed his undergraduate degree at Lincoln Memorial University.  He was a member of both the baseball and basketball teams during this time.  After completing his master’s and doctorate degree at the University of Tennessee, he returned to LMU to serve as the director of admissions and alumni services.  He was also a professor of education and chair of the Department of Education.  He later served several positions at Tennessee Technological University.  In 1992, he returned to LMU as a professor of graduate education.  He then served as interim president and a member of the LMU Board of Trustees.  He has been honored as a member of both the LMU Educators’ Hall of Fame and the LMU Athletes’ Hall of Fame.  Lorraine Daniel Peters also earned a bachelor’s degree from LMU.  She then earned a master’s degree from Tennessee Tech, where she taught for 29 years.

Dr. Martin Peters and Cynthia Whitt award the R. Martin Peters Young Alumnae of the Year award  during homecoming in 2006.

Dr. Martin Peters and Cynthia Whitt award the R. Martin Peters Young Alumnae of the Year award during homecoming in 2006.

The Peters legacy lives on as the R. Martin Peters Young Alumnus of the Year Award, the Martin and Lorraine Peters Endowed Scholarship and the Lorraine D. Peters Endowed Nursing Scholarship are awarded each year. The R. Martin Peters Young Alumnus of the Year Award is awarded at the Alumni Banquet during homecoming to an individual who embodies his ideals. Additionally the Martin Peters Endowed Fund for Athletics exists to fund scholarships and other athletic needs.

Both residence halls will be formally dedicated during the 2014 Homecoming activities October 9-11.

Traveling this summer? Don’t forget Flat Abe.

24 Jun

Balloons released with postcards.There are time honored traditions that every elementary student takes part in. I remember tying a postcard to a balloon and letting it fly, hoping whenever the flight ended someone would find my postcard, note where it landed and send it back to me. Some kids send out messages in bottles or the more traditional chain letter. The lesson in these exercises is to expand the worldview of the student. To show a child that there is so much more than their small insulated community. Similarly, the beloved children’s book Flat Stanley (by Jeff Brown in 1964) has evolved to the Flat Stanley project. In the Flat Stanley children’s books, Stanley travels the world in envelopes. Students who read the books send the paper doll and written notes to students in other parts of the world through conventional mail and e-mail. Children exchange ideas, photographs, questions and culture with students overseas. Once again, a world view is expanded and connections are made.

LMU’s Flat Abe project is aimed at providing a way for LMU students and alumni to share their blue and grey pride and document their travels. Flat Abe can be requested through the LMU Alumni page (alumni.LMUnet.edu/FlatAbe) and getting started is as easy as:

  1. Request Flat Abe
  2. Receive Flat Abe
  3. Take Flat Abe pictures
  4. Share Flat Abe pictures
Flat Abe in Zimbabwe.

Flat Abe visited Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe with Bill Hoffard.

As the alumni page explains, “Abe represents all of the LMU family and our impact on the world, because we represent LMU no matter where we are. Whether we are relaxing on the beach or volunteering our time on mission trips to underserved communities, we are carrying LMU’s legacy with us. And who better to bring with us on those trips but Abe himself?”

Since the program began Flat Abe has had some interesting journeys. He has celebrated important milestones including births, marriages and more. He has made it to quite a few locations including Labadee, Haiti; Cozumel, Mexico; Falmouth, Jamaica; George Town, Cayman Islands; and US cities in Florida, California, Texas, Nevada, and Tennessee. Flat Abe also hung out with some famous people like Clare Bowen from ABC’s Nashville.

Clare Bowen and Flat Abe.

Flat Abe and LMU Alum Jamie Mihalko met Clare Bowen of ABC’s Nashville, where else? In Nashville at a Predator’s Game.

So if summer adventures are on your horizon, don’t forget to pack Flat Abe and share your journeys with the LMU community. LMU Director of Alumni Services Donnie Lipscomb did just that earlier this week when he landed in Shannon, Ireland on his way to Galway with the current LMU Alumni Travel trip to the Emerald Isle.

 

Honest Abe in the Emerald Isle.

Flat Abe arrived in Ireland earlier this week.

Taking Homecoming on the Road: Duncan School of Law

1 Oct

LMU Homecoming 2011: Celebrating Our Creative Legacy

Homecoming officially kicks-off on LMU’s main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., in 13 days. The annual event got underway ahead of schedule last evening with what is sure to become a new tradition – Homecoming events at extended learning sites. Director of Alumni Services Donnie Lipscomb teamed with LMU’s Women of Service to host a Homecoming gathering at the Duncan School of Law. Congressman Jimmy Duncan was also on hand and sponsored the food at the event.

After a week of mid-term exams, a celebration was in order.

Students at DSOL spent the week taking exams, including their final mid-term which took place immediately prior to the Friday night barbeque. Once the final exam was submitted, the students were greeted with hot dogs, beans, potato salad, chili and a sea of desserts.  Additionally, a corn hole tournament was held and door prizes given out.

Congressman Jimmy Duncan shared stories from his early law career.

DSOL Dean and Vice President Sydney A. Beckman kicked off the event and invited Congressman Duncan to speak. The Congressman chatted with students throughout the event and shared a few stories from his legal career before congress with the group. Students, faculty, staff and their families all joined in the fun.

As we continue to take Homecoming on the road, our next stop will be LMU-Cedar Bluff on Tuesday.

More photos from the event:

 

Congressman Duncan greets DSOL students at the Homecoming gathering. The gathering was a family event.

 

DSOL student leaders Kyle Vaughan and Matt Ooten.

 

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