Tag Archives: College

Ready, Set, Pack!

5 Aug

Summer continues to slip through our fingers. Last week LMU welcomed the DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine (LMU-DCOM) Class of 2018 for orientation and today is the first day of class for LMU-DCOM second-year students. The LMU-Duncan School of Law will welcome its newest class for orientation and bridge week on Wednesday and in just two short weeks all our students will be back on campus for fall. So it is time to run down the list of what is bring and what should stay home as you move into the LMU Residence Halls.

What to bring:

  • Pack your sheets, but make sure they are Extra-Long Twin size.

    Pack your sheets, but make sure they are Extra-Long Twin size.

    Linens – Sheets, towels and blankets are always a must. Don’t forget the mattresses are extra-long twins, so your sheets need to be extra-long too. It never hurts to have back-up either, so consider bringing two sets. Don’t forget the mattress cover!

  • Toiletries – Let’s file this under DUH! Who doesn’t want to be clean? I’m sure you wouldn’t be the first student to roll out of bed, into sweats (or not) and rush to that early class. But at some point a shower will be necessary so don’t forget the soap!
  • Shower shoes and robe- Our apartment-style residence halls have private bathrooms, but anyone living in West should be prepared to head down the hall for a shower. Streaking is never ok at LMU, not even on the quad.
  • Shower curtains – Anyone living in the apartment-style residence halls will need to furnish their own shower liner and curtain. If you are in the new Village Apartments don’t forget to check with your suitemate to see if he or she is bringing one.
  • Laundry Supplies – In all residence halls washers and dryers are provided, no quarters necessary. However, you’ll need to provide the hamper, detergent and dryer sheets. Don’t forget the iron, ironing board and hangers.
  • Curtains – All rooms are equipped with mini-blinds, but why not make your room more like home and infuse your sense of style? Embrace your inner interior designer.
  • Small Refrigerator (three cubic feet or less) – The apartment-style residence halls have full-size refrigerators, but if you want a private stash of snacks, a mini-fridge can fit nicely in bedrooms and in West Hall. LP rooms are furnished with refrigerators and microwaves.
  • Desk lamp
  • Personal Computer – Wireless or wired internet is available in all the residence halls.
  • Television, DVD/BluRay player and gaming console –Cable is FREE!, but you need to provide the cord.
  • Coffee Makers – No espresso machines, but you can always stop by Campus Grounds in the Student Center where they proudly serve Starbucks.
  • It's your space, make it personal with wall hangings and personal touches.

    It’s your space, make it personal with wall hangings and personal touches.

    Wall hangings – Back to your inner interior designer. Don’t forget your favorite posters, paintings and pictures of friends. Just be sure to check out the innovations from 3M and Scotch for hanging without putting holes in the walls. No nails please.

  • Stackable Crates
  • Kitchen essentials – If you are in the apartment style housing you’ll need to bring your own dishes, silverware, pots and pans.
  • Rug
  • Cleaning supplies including brooms and dustpans

 

What should stay home

  • George Foreman Grills – Leave the champ at home. Besides, our World of Wings café can cater to any craving.

    Leave the hotplates, electric grills and space heaters at home.

    Leave the hotplates, electric grills and space heaters at home.

  • Candles, incense, hot plate, toaster oven – We like our Railsplitter Athletic teams to be on fire, just not our dorms!
  • Microwave – they are available in common areas in West
  • Pets – Unless it is Fido the fish (non-carnivorous), Fido must stay home.
  • Weapons (guns, knives, archery) – we support your right to bear arms, just not on University grounds.
  • Décor with alcohol/drug images, slogans, phrases, brands or innuendo.
  • Fireworks — Again, fire is bad.
  • Drugs – Just say no!
  • Halogen Lamps

So now you know what should stay and what should go! Want more tips for navigating move-in, dorm life and the overall college experience? Our student bloggers provide first person accounts of their personal Journeys. Check out Mallory Tucker‘s tips on Moving 101. Or, Ashley Pritt‘s tips and tricks to surviving freshman year.

Move-in starts with New Student Survival Weekend on Saturday, August 16.

 

 

 

 

New Student Registration, why should you go?

27 Jun

New Student RegistrationToday 42 new Lincoln Memorial University students visited campus for New Student Registration (NSR). They came with parents and family for the next step in their journey to college. The LMU Admissions team hosts several of these events throughout the summer to prepare for the start of the fall semester and the influx of roughly 600 new students.

What exactly happens at New Student Registration, and why is it important for you to attend if you are new student? Quite simply, NSR is when the groundwork of your first year of college, and possibly all four years, will be laid. During this day-long event you’ll hear multiple presentations about student activities, residence life and student success. But make no mistake; the most important thing that will happen at NSR will be your advising and registration session.

 

Faculty advisor

Dr. Tim Williams, a Vet Tech professor, advises an incoming LMU student during NSR.

During this time you will meet with a faculty advisor within your major. They will ask you several questions about your career and educational goals and help draw you a road map to meet them. You’ll have a list of required courses and electives that will make up your degree. The next step is to put together the puzzle of how to balance your course load on your way to your degree program. It is not as simple as high school may have been, when your guidance counselor scheduled your classes and then checked and double checked to make sure you had all the requirements for graduation. The classes you took in high school were available on a regular schedule, so if you missed chemistry as a junior you could still pick it up as a senior. In college there are a lot more options and a lot more forces influencing the availability of a course.

 

Text book

I was expecting to purchase a book like this one.

Let me share a personal anecdote on the topic of course selection and scheduling. I went to a private Catholic liberal arts college and one of the core/general education requirements was a three-class/9 credit hour cluster of sociology or psychology courses. I had no problem scheduling the first two classes in the cluster but put off the third until the first semester of my senior year because that was when they were offering a sports psychology class as an elective. I was excited about the class when I registered on my way out of town the last semester of my junior year. So you can imagine my surprise when I went to buy my books when I got back to campus that fall and instead of Psychology of Sports the title on my schedule appeared as the Psychology of Human Sex. While I was working my summer away, the faculty of the psychology department changed and the professor who was teaching the sports course left. The new faculty member got to pick her elective based on her area of research. And because I was a senior I couldn’t opt out of the course without delaying my graduation.

Surprise! My sports psychology course changed over the summer to the psychology of human sexuality.

Surprise! My sports psychology course changed over the summer to the psychology of human sexuality.

Now, it was a fascinating course and I fulfilled that requirement and graduated on time, but I never would have picked that course title out on my own. So keep an open mind and be flexible, but also it is important to not procrastinate with the requirements that are outside your major.

Another thing to keep in mind while attending your NSR is the schedule you set in your first semester will color your first experiences at LMU and shape your overall college experience. If you overload yourself with tough classes, you may struggle and wonder if college was the right path for you. Conversely, if you take a lot of less challenging classes you may find yourself lulled into a false sense of brain drain. Like most things in life, the key is balance. Listen to your advisor but don’t be afraid to ask questions if there is something that you are not sure about.

If you are a newly minted high school graduate maybe you are looking forward to one more summer of fun before packing up and heading off to college, or maybe you are working hard to save the money that will fund your higher education. Either way it would be easy to say ‘I don’t need to attend NSR until the semester is closer,’ or ‘I’ll just go to the next one.’ Classes fill up quickly, especially the ones not scheduled at 8 a.m. If you truly want to control your own destiny in terms of class schedule, the earlier you register the better. Nobody wants the 8 a.m. Monday, Wednesday class when there is a 10 a.m. option; so the early bird will get the worm, or in this case the later class.

If you haven’t attended a NSR, there are still three more opportunities. There will be two in July, on the 11th and 25th and the final one will take place on Friday, August 15, 2014, just before the start of the semester on August 18. You can register to attend by visiting www.LMUnet.edu/admissions and selecting the events calendar.

Here we GROW again!

9 Jul

LMU_WordmarkWhen I started work at Lincoln Memorial University on September 15, 2005, the University was a small, liberal arts institution with a main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., and a small handful of extended learning sites where primarily graduate education was delivered. Our student population was under 2,000. At the time that I interviewed for my position there was no mention of possible growth or impending plans to add professional programs. Shortly after I started Vice President for University Advancement Cynthia Whitt, my boss, handed me a brochure on osteopathic medicine and said “oh, learn more about this… we are looking at the possibility of adding a school of osteopathic medicine here.”

The LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine.

The LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine.

That was almost eight years ago. Today our enrollment is over 4,000 students, LMU operates 10 extended learning sites, and not only do we have the LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, it is now one of the largest medical school programs in the state. In addition to osteopathic medicine, LMU-DCOM is home to a top-notch Physician Assistant Program. And the University hasn’t limited its growth to the medical field. In 2009 the LMU-Duncan School of Law opened in Knoxville. As an institution, LMU-DSOL’s Inaugural Class graduation was a highlight of spring. Over my tenure there has also been tremendous physical growth on the main campus as five new residence halls and two new classroom facilities have been built.

One might think that with all that growth, the University would take a breather. However, today is another momentous day for LMU as we announce that the University has been granted a Letter of Reasonable Assurance by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education (COE) and can now recruit students to the emerging LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM).
As LMU Board of Trustees Chairman Autry O.V. “Pete” DeBusk said in the press release, “The approval from the COE to open a new school of veterinary medicine in Harrogate, Tenn., will propel this University to even greater heights and establish LMU as a leader in professional studies for the region.”

The University first announced its plans to pursue a college of veterinary medicine in 2011. Since then a dedicated pocket of LMU administrators and newly hired program directors have been working diligently toward the accreditation process. This group has worked tirelessly toward this day. However, there is no time to sit back and bask in the glow of today. It’s time to push forward and work harder than ever on program development. As the admissions team kicks into high-gear, recruiting the LMU-CVM inaugural class, faculty has to be hired and community partnerships lined up.

LMU is now recruiting for the emerging LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine in Harrogate, Tenn.

LMU is now recruiting for the emerging LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine in Harrogate, Tenn.

There is no time to rest because here we grow again!

The Student Series

7 Aug

Summer on the campus of Lincoln Memorial University is coming to a close. In the last three weeks we have welcomed new students in the LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, LMU-Duncan School of Law and Caylor School of Nursing. Next week brings Faculty/Staff Conference Week which culminates with New Student Survival Week.

It’s hard to believe that it has been three months since the Class of 2012 crossed the stage at Tex Turner Arena, but alas, time flies. It was roughly same time as graduation when I was invited to join a group that was working on recruiting more students for fall. You see, though our retention efforts were on pace to make up any shortfall, our new student projections for this fall were lacking. After nearly 10 years of record breaking enrollments, LMU had reached a plateau.

You can point the finger in many directions as to why our new student numbers were down. There is the economy, the intimidating notion of college or simply the fear of not fitting in. Another factor in LMU’s new student short fall was the strides the University was taking to increase admissions standards and enhance its academic rigor.

So roughly three months ago, I was invited to join that committee to brainstorm on what things we could do to finish the recruitment cycle strong and bring more new students to LMU. The group included a trustee, the Dean of Enrollment Management, the Director of Admissions, the Dean of Community College relations and the Dean of Administration plus a University employee that specializes in promotions.

The group immediately went to where everyone goes for a quick fix, marketing efforts. They inquired if we had done enough marketing, if we had ran enough ads, if there was something that we could do to get more people to apply? What were we doing right now? I always feel uncomfortable when those questions start to fly. Not because they aren’t valid questions, but because I always feel like no matter what I’m going to say it’s going to sound defensive.  The cold hard facts for this group at that moment were that it was May and the advertising budget had been planned and spent months ago. So there would be no quick fixes.

Looking for plan b, we discussed the current applicant pool and discovered that there was a fairly large group of applicants who had already applied and been accepted to LMU, but had not registered to join the Class of 2017. To me, it was the golden ticket. Here was a group that we already knew were interested enough to apply to LMU. The admissions folks told us that they had been communicating with this group for months and that they were just taking extra time making decisions. “They haven’t told us they aren’t coming to LMU or that they were going anywhere else. Our counselors have called them and they keep saying they are still making their decision,” Admissions Director Sherry McCreary reported to the group.

If they were still in the market to come to LMU, I assumed that repeated calls from our admissions counselors would only do so much. We needed to find a different way to reach them. The group discussed the University’s greatest selling points including the picturesque campus and engaging student body. “A lot of times all it takes is for prospective students to tour the campus and they are sold,” the admissions folks reported. This led to a discussion of adding another recruitment event like our Railsplitter for a Day or Preview Day events, but with several new student orientations already scheduled throughout the summer there was no time to add something else. Which brought us to the conclusion that if we couldn’t get prospective to students to Harrogate, maybe there was a way to bring Harrogate to our prospective students.

The result was a communication plan that included video embedded emails addressed to those accepted, but not registered students and the student series was born.

The series of videos features a host of current LMU students telling about why they chose LMU and sharing what their lives at LMU are like.

I would like to tell you that the student series was a massive success and we were able to convert 150 of the 300 people in that pool of accepted applicants into registered students. However, I not sure that is the truth and we won’t have final figures until classes start. Whether we still come up short or not, the student videos have been a big hit and something our admissions staff has already said we need to continue to utilize.

Changes coming for fall.

17 Jul

I mentioned last week in strategic planning that there were at least four topics that I needed to address with press releases during strategic planning. Late last week, I tackled the first – the recasting of the Paul V. Hamilton School of Arts and Sciences.

The move to split the study of arts and sciences was an important decision for LMU. One that will allow further program development and help LMU serve its students better. The recasting created the Paul V. Hamilton School of Mathematics and Sciences and the School of Arts and Humanities.

Vice President for Academic Affairs Clayton Hess announced the changes during the strategic planning retreat and in a memo to faculty in the affected disciplines. The change took effect on July 2.

Dr. Amiel Jarstfer, the former dean of the combined school, will lead the Hamilton School of Mathematics and Sciences while Dr. Martin Sellers formerly the dean of research and service will head the School of Arts and Humanities.

The Hamilton School of Mathematics and Science includes the departments of mathematics, biology, chemistry and physics and will be housed in the nearly completed state-of-the art Math and Science center. The School of Arts and Humanities includes the departments of English, humanities and fine arts, social sciences and social work and is housed primarily in Avery Hall.

Among the program development are enhancements to LMU fine arts department. The University has acquired several buildings and land in the Town of Cumberland Gap with plans to move fine arts into the Gap and provide room to expand offerings in narrative arts. LMU had previously purchased the Cumberland Gap Convention Center and plans to use that to host dinner theater productions among other cultural events.

The creation of two new schools is another exciting change at LMU.

ROTC service & scholarship

19 Sep

At LMU, there is a long history of military service. In fact, as the United States was preparing to enter World War II, LMU was preparing pilots to enlist as an official training ground for the U.S. Army. The official presence of a military branch on campus has come and gown over time, but in the last five years, a resurgence is underway.

LMU’s U.S. Army Reserved Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) resurfaced on campus through a partnership with the Carson-Newman ROTC program. The program reached a milestone last week as it awarded its first Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty (GRFD) Scholarship to junior Christina Dudash. Dudash is studying medical technology. She has been involved in the ROTC program since she started at LMU.

GRFD scholarships are available through the U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) for students that desire to participate in the Senior ROTC program. These scholarships guarantee that the student once graduated from school and commissioned in the U.S. Army must serve their obligation in the USAR or Army National Guard. The scholarships provide for two years of benefits. To be eligible for the scholarship, students must have exactly two years of school remaining. With the tightening of budgets and limited available funds, the scholarships are very competitive.

The GRFS scholarships cover tuition and board up to $20,000 a year. They also include funding for books and a monthly stipend. Students are selected based on grade point average, standing in ROTC program, major and grade point average in military science class as well as Army Physical Fitness Test scores.

Military Science courses are open to all students. However, to enroll in advanced ROTC courses which lead to a commission as a Second Lieutenant, a student must meet US Army administrative, physical, medical and mental standards and be accepted by the Professor of Military Science. The LMU program is tied to the Carson-Newman ROTC program. Many of the advanced lab and train programs are done jointly

The grace period is over.

1 Sep

An example of illegal parking that will now result in ticketing and fines.

Cars resting with two wheels on the curb, half on the road and half on the sidewalk, were not an unusual sight at LMU over the past week. But illegal parkers beware; your grace period is officially over. LMU Chief of Campus Police and Security Bill Sowder said his officers would begin ticketing in earnest this week.

Dean of Administration Lisa Blair-Cox has been hard at work, reviewing and updating parking policy and fine structure.  The LMU Office of Security is responsible for enforcing campus traffic regulations and conducting public safety activities. This group of individuals is dedicated to keeping our campus safe and they should be taken seriously and treated with respect.

Parking issues are a problem that plague campuses nationwide. There are universities that issue thousands more parking passes than they actually have spaces. And, in many cases, those students and faculty pay hefty prices with no absolute guarantee of a spot, let alone a desirable one.

Another example of illegal parking.

LMU parking is plentiful, but it is not always desirable. Most people, even residential students, jockey for spots close to the quad for classes at Avery, Farr-Chinnock and the Harold S. Finley Learning Resource center. Even the small lot in front of Kresge Hall fills quickly once classes are in session. It’s important that residential students remember their spaces are reserved around the residence halls and not in the commuter lots. The University now offers a shuttle service throughout the day to help students get to classes stretched all over campus.

Not only that, Cox and company have been reviewing current traffic policies and problem areas on campus. Recognizing the University’s growth has made specific areas like the dining hall during dining hours a real challenge in terms of parking, dining hall participants’ vehicles will not be ticketed during dining hours (with the exception of handicapped parking). Keep in mind, this is not a free pass to park on the lawn behind the dining hall during non-dining hours and if you leave your vehicle there, it will be ticketed.

The speed limit is marked in all areas around campus and drivers must obey all traffic signs, directional signs and directions/instructions from security. Speed is enforced by radar. If you blow by a security officer and they deem it unsafe to immediately stop and ticket you, you are not off the hook. The ticketing officer will record the vehicle description and license plate number in order to complete issuance of the ticket at the next available opportunity.

Absolutely no parking in handicap spaces unless official handicap tagging is visible. Handicapped parking tags can be obtained from the LMU Office of Security.  These parking spaces are reserved exclusively for those students, staff, faculty and visitors who have handicapped parking authorization as indicated by state tags or by hang tags. Compliance is strictly enforced. Individuals failing to display parking authorization will be subjected to a $200 fine (in accordance with state law).

Parking on the grass will result in a higher fine.

All individuals that receive a ticket must either pay the fine or schedule an appointment in Traffic Court within 72 hours of ticket receipt. If one should get a parking or speeding ticket, fines may be paid at the Cashier’s Office in the Student Center, third floor, prior to or after Traffic Court.  Failure to pay fines can result in a hold being placed on your account.

Traffic Violation Fines

Unregistered/ Illegal parking:                                      $15.00

Speeding:                                                                          $25.00

Reckless Driving:                                                             $50.00

Discarding/Tearing up of ticket:                                  $50.00

Parking on grass or dirt area:                                      $25.00

Unauthorized Handicap:                                               $200.00 (in accordance with state law)

Parking in Fire Lane                                                       $75.00

If parking is not available at your assigned residential hall students are encouraged to utilize the Tex Turner Arena for overflow parking.

Another example of illegal parking.