Tag Archives: English

Changes coming for fall.

17 Jul

I mentioned last week in strategic planning that there were at least four topics that I needed to address with press releases during strategic planning. Late last week, I tackled the first – the recasting of the Paul V. Hamilton School of Arts and Sciences.

The move to split the study of arts and sciences was an important decision for LMU. One that will allow further program development and help LMU serve its students better. The recasting created the Paul V. Hamilton School of Mathematics and Sciences and the School of Arts and Humanities.

Vice President for Academic Affairs Clayton Hess announced the changes during the strategic planning retreat and in a memo to faculty in the affected disciplines. The change took effect on July 2.

Dr. Amiel Jarstfer, the former dean of the combined school, will lead the Hamilton School of Mathematics and Sciences while Dr. Martin Sellers formerly the dean of research and service will head the School of Arts and Humanities.

The Hamilton School of Mathematics and Science includes the departments of mathematics, biology, chemistry and physics and will be housed in the nearly completed state-of-the art Math and Science center. The School of Arts and Humanities includes the departments of English, humanities and fine arts, social sciences and social work and is housed primarily in Avery Hall.

Among the program development are enhancements to LMU fine arts department. The University has acquired several buildings and land in the Town of Cumberland Gap with plans to move fine arts into the Gap and provide room to expand offerings in narrative arts. LMU had previously purchased the Cumberland Gap Convention Center and plans to use that to host dinner theater productions among other cultural events.

The creation of two new schools is another exciting change at LMU.

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LMU welcomes Japanese students

21 Mar

LMU-Kanto Program Director Curtis Klinghoffer greets the Kanto International High School Students during orientation on Tuesday.

The long journey was complete Monday night as 57 students and two teachers from Kanto International Senior High School in Tokyo, Japan, arrived at Lincoln Memorial University. The group was met by LMU’s Kanto Program Director Curtis Klinghoffer, Assistant Director JoAnn Russell and a handful of residential life staff members to help move them into the rooms that will be their home for the next seven weeks.The English immersion program began in earnest on Tuesday morning with orientation. LMU President Dr. B. James Dawson, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Evelyn Smith, Dean of Students Frank E. Smith and Director of Housing Leslie Chumley were among the administration to greet the students during orientation. In addition to the well wishes from LMU brass, the students were introduced to their instructors, received their class schedules, went on a campus tour and were issued IDs. After lunch in the LMU dining hall, the students were given the afternoon to explore campus and get acquainted with the area. Several found their way to the LMU softball game for their first truly American experience.

Kanto Instructor Kathy Francisco gives a group of Kanto students a campus tour during orientation.

Students have come annually to LMU from the Kanto International Senior High School since the LMU-Kanto Program began in 1979. This group of 57 students will spend the next six weeks engaging in rigorous, immersive English studies and an extracurricular cultural program that exposes them to the richness of the culture of the Appalachian region. In addition, the group will take a three-day excursion to Washington, D.C. The students also make home stays with host families.

The home stay involves a family welcoming a Kanto student into their home for a weekend. The encounter begins with the family picking the student up Friday evening. The student must be back to campus some time on Sunday. The LMU-Kanto Program is still looking for families to host students this spring. Russell, who coordinates the home stays, says the students are looking for anything more than a look at a typical weekend at home. “They really want to see what is like to live in an American home. They aren’t looking for any big exciting side trip or anything. They are here to learn English and experience our culture.”

As much as the students gain from this experience, the benefits are reciprocal: the entire LMU community is enriched by the presence of these Japanese students who teach about their own customs and traditions.