Tag Archives: Harrogate

1067 lbs of produce?

11 Jul
The Gardeners Grove is home to the LMU Organic Garden Project

The Gardeners Grove is home to the LMU Organic Garden Project

Lincoln Memorial University is on a mission to serve underserved populations in Appalachia and beyond. You probably know that the University pursues that mission by providing educational opportunities. An email in my inbox this morning reminded me that although LMU fulfills this mission with class offerings, new programs and professional degree opportunities; it also uses swimming pools, stethoscopes, paintbrushes and produce.

Produce? Yes, as in squash, peppers, cabbage, cucumbers and tomatoes.

Say what? Yes, 1067 lbs., of squash, peppers, cabbage, cucumbers and tomatoes to be exact. And that doesn’t account for the summer crops that have been planted and haven’t started to yield a crop. Oh, and all of these crops are organically grown. What does all this produce have to do with LMU or her mission?

In January of 2010 the LMU Board of Trustees set aside a small portion of the LMU Main Campus’s 1,000 acres in Harrogate, Tenn., to establish an organic garden. The goal was to provide a place for community members, both from LMU and the surrounding counties, who might not have access to land or resources to grown their own food and learn organic gardening.

IMG_2212The LMU Organic Garden facilities are located on the south side of campus past LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine near the roundabout. Today the garden includes two green houses and is split into two sections. The adult garden consists of 75 raised beds and ¾ of an acre community garden. The adult section includes three wheel chair accessible raised beds. The children’s garden consists of 25 raised beds and a ¼ acre community garden. Additionally, there is a ¼ acre produce market garden which is used to teach young adults successful market skills. Garden members have the opportunity to grow their own food in individual beds. Additionally they have access to a classroom/kitchen to attend weekly meetings each Monday, which often include guest speakers. Classes are offered for planting and soil preparation, canning and healthy eating. Produce is shared with local families and community food banks. Funded in part by grants from Grow Appalachia in Berea, Ky., and the Cumberland Natural Resource Association, the LMU Organic Garden offers free beds, seeds, home gardens and plants to its members.

The high tunnel gives gardeners more options during the growing seasons.

The high tunnel gives gardeners more options during the growing seasons.

While the growth at the garden has been gradual, progress is apparent as the roots of the group take hold. A high tunnel has been added in the last year providing another opportunity to multiply the crops. That 1067 lbs. of produces is up from 325 pounds a year ago. There are 52 families, a total of 132 individuals, participating in the garden and their weekly classes are usually filled to the brim. The group joined the Harrogate Farmers Market and the spring plant sale generated $674 and 200 vegetable plants were donated to local food ministries. All told, between providing healthy food to the participants, selling produce at the market and donating plants to ministries, the garden is extending LMU’s mission by providing for the underserved.

The LMU Organic Garden is managed by Bill Clayton and Sue Granger. Bonnie Banks is the green house manager and administrative duties are handled by Debbie Clayton. Applications are available by contacting Bill Clayton at organichillbilly_lmu@yahoo.com; or Sue Granger at doglovercaery@netscape.net or Debbie Clayton at debbiehoneybee9@gmail.com. For more information on the organization call Bill Clayton at 423.441.9133.

The LMU Organic Gardening Project is a partner site of Grow Appalachia, http://www.growappalachia.org an outreach education and service project of Berea College. It is funded by the generosity of John Paul Dejoria, co-founder and CEO of John Paul Mitchell Systems, Inc. Grow Appalachia emphasizes food production in order to introduce as much no-cost, fresh healthy food as possible to the region. The basic goal is to help as many families grow as much of their own food as possible. Additional financial support has come from Walmart in Tazewell and the 2014 Youth Garden Grant from the National Gardening Association.

The garden also produces honey from these bee hives.

The garden also produces honey from these bee hives.

One of two greenhouses at the garden.

One of two greenhouses at the garden.

 

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Photo of the day

3 Jul
Matthew Hunt's photo captured during a recen storm is featured as the Smithsoian Magazine's Photo of the Day.

Matthew Hunt’s photo captured during a recen storm is featured as the Smithsoian Magazine’s Photo of the Day.

It’s not every day that Lincoln Memorial University is featured in the national media, but that is exactly what happened today thanks to Smithsonian Magazine. In a regular feature entitled Photo of the Day, a dynamic shot of the LMU campus during a lightning storm is displayed. The shot was captured by Matthew Hunt shows lightning striking the campus near the LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine (LMU-DCOM). Matthew is a photographer and physician assistant student at LMU-DCOM. He is a member of the Class of 2015.

New Student Registration, why should you go?

27 Jun

New Student RegistrationToday 42 new Lincoln Memorial University students visited campus for New Student Registration (NSR). They came with parents and family for the next step in their journey to college. The LMU Admissions team hosts several of these events throughout the summer to prepare for the start of the fall semester and the influx of roughly 600 new students.

What exactly happens at New Student Registration, and why is it important for you to attend if you are new student? Quite simply, NSR is when the groundwork of your first year of college, and possibly all four years, will be laid. During this day-long event you’ll hear multiple presentations about student activities, residence life and student success. But make no mistake; the most important thing that will happen at NSR will be your advising and registration session.

 

Faculty advisor

Dr. Tim Williams, a Vet Tech professor, advises an incoming LMU student during NSR.

During this time you will meet with a faculty advisor within your major. They will ask you several questions about your career and educational goals and help draw you a road map to meet them. You’ll have a list of required courses and electives that will make up your degree. The next step is to put together the puzzle of how to balance your course load on your way to your degree program. It is not as simple as high school may have been, when your guidance counselor scheduled your classes and then checked and double checked to make sure you had all the requirements for graduation. The classes you took in high school were available on a regular schedule, so if you missed chemistry as a junior you could still pick it up as a senior. In college there are a lot more options and a lot more forces influencing the availability of a course.

 

Text book

I was expecting to purchase a book like this one.

Let me share a personal anecdote on the topic of course selection and scheduling. I went to a private Catholic liberal arts college and one of the core/general education requirements was a three-class/9 credit hour cluster of sociology or psychology courses. I had no problem scheduling the first two classes in the cluster but put off the third until the first semester of my senior year because that was when they were offering a sports psychology class as an elective. I was excited about the class when I registered on my way out of town the last semester of my junior year. So you can imagine my surprise when I went to buy my books when I got back to campus that fall and instead of Psychology of Sports the title on my schedule appeared as the Psychology of Human Sex. While I was working my summer away, the faculty of the psychology department changed and the professor who was teaching the sports course left. The new faculty member got to pick her elective based on her area of research. And because I was a senior I couldn’t opt out of the course without delaying my graduation.

Surprise! My sports psychology course changed over the summer to the psychology of human sexuality.

Surprise! My sports psychology course changed over the summer to the psychology of human sexuality.

Now, it was a fascinating course and I fulfilled that requirement and graduated on time, but I never would have picked that course title out on my own. So keep an open mind and be flexible, but also it is important to not procrastinate with the requirements that are outside your major.

Another thing to keep in mind while attending your NSR is the schedule you set in your first semester will color your first experiences at LMU and shape your overall college experience. If you overload yourself with tough classes, you may struggle and wonder if college was the right path for you. Conversely, if you take a lot of less challenging classes you may find yourself lulled into a false sense of brain drain. Like most things in life, the key is balance. Listen to your advisor but don’t be afraid to ask questions if there is something that you are not sure about.

If you are a newly minted high school graduate maybe you are looking forward to one more summer of fun before packing up and heading off to college, or maybe you are working hard to save the money that will fund your higher education. Either way it would be easy to say ‘I don’t need to attend NSR until the semester is closer,’ or ‘I’ll just go to the next one.’ Classes fill up quickly, especially the ones not scheduled at 8 a.m. If you truly want to control your own destiny in terms of class schedule, the earlier you register the better. Nobody wants the 8 a.m. Monday, Wednesday class when there is a 10 a.m. option; so the early bird will get the worm, or in this case the later class.

If you haven’t attended a NSR, there are still three more opportunities. There will be two in July, on the 11th and 25th and the final one will take place on Friday, August 15, 2014, just before the start of the semester on August 18. You can register to attend by visiting www.LMUnet.edu/admissions and selecting the events calendar.

Is Facebook the cure for the World School Blues?

8 Nov

Five days ago I attended the World School International Forum 2012 closing banquet. It was the last event on a packed schedule for delegates from 21 countries around the world and while I expected it to be emotional for the nearly 100 high school students and teacher chaperones that had spent two weeks forming friendships and unbreakable bonds, I wasn’t prepared for the abundance of tears.

The mission of World School is to create a truly borderless entity for the purpose of helping the participants create their image of an ideal educational program. The program is designed to train students to adopt a global perspective by becoming receptive to differences and to enable them to form lasting friendships. It will also prepare them to excel in a globalized society. To accomplish this, a forum has been held once a year since 1997 to give students from around the world an opportunity to come together and learn from each other. These forums were held in Tokyo, Japan, from 1997 – 2001, then LMU became the first institution to host the event outside of the founding country in 2002. Ten years later, it was the University’s turn to host the event again.

It’s no wonder the students, and teachers too, shed some tears on their last day, because in the 11 days that came before life changing friendships were made, borders were torn down and a truly global community built on respect was created.

Hailing from Australia, Canada, South Korea, New Zealand, Indonesia, South Africa, Turkey, Romania, France, Russia, Italy, United Kingdom, Japan, Thailand, Germany, India, Sri Lanka, China, Finland and Macau the delegates all landed in Knoxville before boarding buses and vans to take them to the Cumberland Mountains that LMU calls home. After settling into LMU residence Halls and celebrating the opening of the Forum with the Opening Ceremonies, the international contingent was on the road again for an excursion to Washington, D.C.

Things didn’t slow any on their return to Tennessee, as home stay would greet them. The students and teachers were split among community members to get a taste of home life in America. They returned to LMU for an intense second week of more academic pursuits. The education theme for the forum was Environment: Housing and Volunteerism and the students spent a lot of time preparing for a debate on the topic. The second week also included booth day and country performances where they shared information about their country with over 1,000 community members and school children.

The country performances included everything from –

the evolution of dance in the United States:

To the international sensation that is South Korea’s PSY Gangham Style (check it out around the 3 minute mark).

To the Aussies sharing a holiday favorite from Down Under.  Jingle Bells with no snow?

I had a very limited role in World School, mainly to photograph selected events as my schedule permitted. My family also played host for a pair of students during home stay (more on that in another post). Even as an outside observer, it was clear that special bonds were formed every step of the way.

During the closing banquet the delegates were warned of the “World School Blues” that could greet them when they returned to their home countries. At first, I was skeptical. I thought, these kids have been away from home and their families for nearly two weeks, surely they will be happy to have the comforts of home. They have been staying in institutional residence halls without the benefits of customizing them like college students do. They had been eating strange food and kept on a tight schedule with little down time to just chill. Surely, home was calling. But then I watched as they shared memories throughout the banquet and at its conclusion began moving around in small groups alternately hugging, crying and snapping pictures and I knew home was far from their minds.

 In that moment, as an adult who has said goodbye to my fair share of friends over the years, I was envious of their connections.  I remember crying over friends as I said goodbye every summer at the end of summer camp. I cried because I knew that I was not likely to see or hear from until the next summer. These World School delegates weren’t crying over that. They may never be in the same room again, but they would always know what was happening in Montreal, Paris, New Zealand or even Harrogate. Technology has changed everything. Facebook is now a conduit to maintaining these friendships. While the delegates may get the “World School Blues” longing to sneak out of a residence hall to meet up for midnight talks or miss a certain delegate’s unforgettable laugh, they’ll always be just a few clicks away from seeing their friends.

Where in the world is the world?

8 Jul

Checking out the nearly completed Math and Science building earlier this week, I couldn’t help but notice that there was something missing. Actually, there are a lot of things missing at this point, but amid the dust and debris of building crews putting the finishing touches on the main lobby, my eye was drawn to what’s not there. At the center of the lobby area, across from where crews have taken great care to install stately marble, stands an area that is clearly waiting for something. The marble, which was reclaimed from the walls of the former Baptist Hospital in downtown Knoxville, adds opulence to the building even in its unfinished state yet there is still a gaping hole.

 

The Math and Science Building lobby.

The tiled floor lays the ground work for what is to come. If you were to walk in the main entrance of the Math and Science Center today, you would see a large square with three poles waiting for something. What in the world are we waiting for? Well actually, it’s the world.

Months ago, LMU Chairman Pete DeBusk commissioned Top Stone to create a four-foot rolling sphere fountain and it’s to be installed in the lobby as soon as it arrives. The globe etched sphere can be turned, spun and stopped by hand. However, if left alone the North Pole goes back to the north position. The 5,500 pound sphere floats on a thin layer of water. Top Stones uses unique technology in their fountain. It’s surely a lesson in physics, which is only fitting for the Math and Science Center.

A globe etched stone fountain similar to this on is on its way to LMU.

Top Stone announced the shipment of the LMU fountain in a press release on May 29, 2012. The completed work has been en route every since. The extreme spring and early summer weather and storms have slowed its journey. Approximately two weeks ago, University officials were notified that it had arrived in the New York Harbor and was sitting on a shipping vessel.

We can only assume that it is now on its way to Harrogate, Tenn., by truck. With just over three weeks until LMU-DCOM Class of 2016 orientation is slated to take place in the large auditorium on the first floor of the Math and Science Building, let’s hope the world is here to greet them.

 

 

 

 

A close call, close to home.

11 Mar

If you have ever visited Kresge Hall or been to a University Advancement event, then likely you know who Angela Jordan is. If not, you are missing out. This remarkable woman puts all of us at UA first. She never ceases to lend a hand, help out or just listen to whatever may be on your mind. Her official title is administrative assistant to the vice president for University Advancement, but she really does so much more than assist for our entire division. More than just an assistant, Angie mothers us all.

No matter how many times she has been recipient of one of my eye rolls when she fusses at me for carrying too much, she still cares enough to chastise me any time I lift more than I should. She often tells me that she doesn’t care if I think I can do it, she knows that I shouldn’t. There is never a day that I leave work without her telling me do drive safe and take care.

When the devastating storms hit Harrogate on Friday, March 2, 2012, Angie’s house was struck by one of the tornados that ravaged neighborhoods across the street from LMU. She and her husband were thankfully unharmed, but the house and property sustained much damage. Angie asked me to help her thank the community who came to her aid. She said that she felt a thank you card wasn’t enough and wondered if I would print something in our University newsletter, CampusLinc, which I assured her I would. I also encouraged her to share with me her story and the following is just that…

 

Extending a helping hand

9 Mar

A week ago, our mild winter erupted into an outbreak of damaging storms which lashed out across the Southeast. At LMU, two rounds of tornado warnings came down during the day on Friday, March 2, before the most damaging storms arrived around 8 p.m. Through it all, LMU’s main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., was spared damage. Reports from that night included just wind, light rain and a short burst of hail. Some of our historic trees lost a few limbs, but the University had seen worse.

Our neighbors just across Highway 25E did not fare as well. The initial reports on Friday described as many as 10 houses that were totally destroyed. Those same reports placed them all in the City of Harrogate in the area behind Ellen Myers Elementary School. And the reports were fairly accurate.

By the time the weather service confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down in the area earlier this week, the clean-up effort was already well underway. Emergency responders rescued trapped residents and helped guide people around downed power lines immediately following the storms on Friday. In the light of day on Saturday, more volunteers joined the efforts as neighbors helped neighbors to assess the damage and start to clear the debris.

After a weekend full of reports from the storm damaged areas, the burning question on most people’s minds on Monday was, how could LMU help? The Student Services division was contacted by several students about going into the community and helping in any way possible. On Wednesday, a team of about 15 students, including most of the Lady Railsplitter volleyball team, and the entire Student Services staff assisted in clean-up efforts at two residences.

A camera crew from LMU-TV followed the LMU volunteers and filed this report.

On Thursday, the student services team was at it again, helping two more families clear debris around their homes.

 I had the privilege of being a part of the clean-up yesterday. Seeing the destruction up close was remarkable. Even more remarkable, was the spirit of community that radiated out of this devastation. Sure, a few homeowners shared stories of people salvaging through debris and looking to take advantage of the people affected by the storms, but, the majority had also experienced complete strangers coming up and assisting in the clean-up.

LMU is about service. The University believes that one of the major cornerstones of meaningful existence is service to humanity. Our students routinely volunteer in their communities. What is so impressive about this service, is that it was a grassroots effort initiated by students. The students went to administration looking for a way to help. The Student Services division, inspired by the students’ request went to President B. James Dawson and asked for permission not only to take the students over to help, but to volunteer as well. The Student Services division went on to sacrifice two days to assist their neighbors and the work isn’t complete yet.

Student leaders and the administration have reached out to a number of the relief organizations working in the area, offering to recruit and organize teams of student volunteers as the recovery efforts turn to rebuilding.

Knoxville’s WBIR-TV also sent a reporter to cover the recovery efforts. A link to reporter Mary Scott’s story is below.

WBIR VIDEO