Tag Archives: LMU-Duncan School of Law

Ready, Set, Pack!

5 Aug

Summer continues to slip through our fingers. Last week LMU welcomed the DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine (LMU-DCOM) Class of 2018 for orientation and today is the first day of class for LMU-DCOM second-year students. The LMU-Duncan School of Law will welcome its newest class for orientation and bridge week on Wednesday and in just two short weeks all our students will be back on campus for fall. So it is time to run down the list of what is bring and what should stay home as you move into the LMU Residence Halls.

What to bring:

  • Pack your sheets, but make sure they are Extra-Long Twin size.

    Pack your sheets, but make sure they are Extra-Long Twin size.

    Linens – Sheets, towels and blankets are always a must. Don’t forget the mattresses are extra-long twins, so your sheets need to be extra-long too. It never hurts to have back-up either, so consider bringing two sets. Don’t forget the mattress cover!

  • Toiletries – Let’s file this under DUH! Who doesn’t want to be clean? I’m sure you wouldn’t be the first student to roll out of bed, into sweats (or not) and rush to that early class. But at some point a shower will be necessary so don’t forget the soap!
  • Shower shoes and robe- Our apartment-style residence halls have private bathrooms, but anyone living in West should be prepared to head down the hall for a shower. Streaking is never ok at LMU, not even on the quad.
  • Shower curtains – Anyone living in the apartment-style residence halls will need to furnish their own shower liner and curtain. If you are in the new Village Apartments don’t forget to check with your suitemate to see if he or she is bringing one.
  • Laundry Supplies – In all residence halls washers and dryers are provided, no quarters necessary. However, you’ll need to provide the hamper, detergent and dryer sheets. Don’t forget the iron, ironing board and hangers.
  • Curtains – All rooms are equipped with mini-blinds, but why not make your room more like home and infuse your sense of style? Embrace your inner interior designer.
  • Small Refrigerator (three cubic feet or less) – The apartment-style residence halls have full-size refrigerators, but if you want a private stash of snacks, a mini-fridge can fit nicely in bedrooms and in West Hall. LP rooms are furnished with refrigerators and microwaves.
  • Desk lamp
  • Personal Computer – Wireless or wired internet is available in all the residence halls.
  • Television, DVD/BluRay player and gaming console –Cable is FREE!, but you need to provide the cord.
  • Coffee Makers – No espresso machines, but you can always stop by Campus Grounds in the Student Center where they proudly serve Starbucks.
  • It's your space, make it personal with wall hangings and personal touches.

    It’s your space, make it personal with wall hangings and personal touches.

    Wall hangings – Back to your inner interior designer. Don’t forget your favorite posters, paintings and pictures of friends. Just be sure to check out the innovations from 3M and Scotch for hanging without putting holes in the walls. No nails please.

  • Stackable Crates
  • Kitchen essentials – If you are in the apartment style housing you’ll need to bring your own dishes, silverware, pots and pans.
  • Rug
  • Cleaning supplies including brooms and dustpans

 

What should stay home

  • George Foreman Grills – Leave the champ at home. Besides, our World of Wings café can cater to any craving.

    Leave the hotplates, electric grills and space heaters at home.

    Leave the hotplates, electric grills and space heaters at home.

  • Candles, incense, hot plate, toaster oven – We like our Railsplitter Athletic teams to be on fire, just not our dorms!
  • Microwave – they are available in common areas in West
  • Pets – Unless it is Fido the fish (non-carnivorous), Fido must stay home.
  • Weapons (guns, knives, archery) – we support your right to bear arms, just not on University grounds.
  • Décor with alcohol/drug images, slogans, phrases, brands or innuendo.
  • Fireworks — Again, fire is bad.
  • Drugs – Just say no!
  • Halogen Lamps

So now you know what should stay and what should go! Want more tips for navigating move-in, dorm life and the overall college experience? Our student bloggers provide first person accounts of their personal Journeys. Check out Mallory Tucker‘s tips on Moving 101. Or, Ashley Pritt‘s tips and tricks to surviving freshman year.

Move-in starts with New Student Survival Weekend on Saturday, August 16.

 

 

 

 

Here we GROW again!

9 Jul

LMU_WordmarkWhen I started work at Lincoln Memorial University on September 15, 2005, the University was a small, liberal arts institution with a main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., and a small handful of extended learning sites where primarily graduate education was delivered. Our student population was under 2,000. At the time that I interviewed for my position there was no mention of possible growth or impending plans to add professional programs. Shortly after I started Vice President for University Advancement Cynthia Whitt, my boss, handed me a brochure on osteopathic medicine and said “oh, learn more about this… we are looking at the possibility of adding a school of osteopathic medicine here.”

The LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine.

The LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine.

That was almost eight years ago. Today our enrollment is over 4,000 students, LMU operates 10 extended learning sites, and not only do we have the LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, it is now one of the largest medical school programs in the state. In addition to osteopathic medicine, LMU-DCOM is home to a top-notch Physician Assistant Program. And the University hasn’t limited its growth to the medical field. In 2009 the LMU-Duncan School of Law opened in Knoxville. As an institution, LMU-DSOL’s Inaugural Class graduation was a highlight of spring. Over my tenure there has also been tremendous physical growth on the main campus as five new residence halls and two new classroom facilities have been built.

One might think that with all that growth, the University would take a breather. However, today is another momentous day for LMU as we announce that the University has been granted a Letter of Reasonable Assurance by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education (COE) and can now recruit students to the emerging LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine (LMU-CVM).
As LMU Board of Trustees Chairman Autry O.V. “Pete” DeBusk said in the press release, “The approval from the COE to open a new school of veterinary medicine in Harrogate, Tenn., will propel this University to even greater heights and establish LMU as a leader in professional studies for the region.”

The University first announced its plans to pursue a college of veterinary medicine in 2011. Since then a dedicated pocket of LMU administrators and newly hired program directors have been working diligently toward the accreditation process. This group has worked tirelessly toward this day. However, there is no time to sit back and bask in the glow of today. It’s time to push forward and work harder than ever on program development. As the admissions team kicks into high-gear, recruiting the LMU-CVM inaugural class, faculty has to be hired and community partnerships lined up.

LMU is now recruiting for the emerging LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine in Harrogate, Tenn.

LMU is now recruiting for the emerging LMU-College of Veterinary Medicine in Harrogate, Tenn.

There is no time to rest because here we grow again!

Olympic Fever

6 Aug

With 10 days down and six (seven if you count today) more to go, the world has Olympic fever. Here in the U.S., the first 10 days have brought us to our feet cheering as Michael Phelps added six medals to his Olympic haul (making him the most decorated Olympian of all time), the “Fab Five” U.S. Gymnastic Team overcame distracting turmoil from the individual competition to dominate on its way to gold and Missy Franklin became the most popular “regular high school kid” in America.

Whether the somewhat strange opening ceremony caught your eye or you’ve been caught up in the sports action or NBC’s tape delayed coverage has you tweeting #NBCfail, Americans have been tuning in droves. My daily exclamation filled emails from our WBIR rep has confirmed that many in the Knoxville area have been part of the droves. Hopefully, that means they’ve also caught LMU’s newest commercials.

 

A newspaper ad that was part of the 2008 “I am a Railsplitter” campaign for LMU.

Four years ago we had tremendous feedback and response to the TV campaign we ran during the Beijing Games. The campaign included one of the very first tv spots for LMU, “I am a Railsplitter.” The spot was part of a larger campaign that featured some of our most successful alumni. Beyond the television advertising, we also ran print ads and even some radio flights in the Knoxville area.

This time around our campaign features the tag line “I am LMU.” The spot itself is a “mash-up” of seven individual spots we have developed to highlight the varied career paths available at LMU. Those spots included “I am a nurse,” “I am a teacher,” “I am an osteopathic physician,” “I am a lawyer,” “I am physician assistant,” “I am a veterinary technician” and “I am a business professional.” Beyond emphasizing the multitude of majors at LMU, the spots are also feature some of our brightest students, most caring and involved faculty and successful alumni. Underscored throughout the campaign is the message that LMU is mission driven. The University is not only training the next generation of osteopathic physicians, nurses, physician assistants, educators, veterinary technicians, lawyers and business professionals, we are training them to serve humanity and improve the quality of life in Appalachia.

Though the commercial debuted during the Summer Olympics, the “I am LMU” campaign will continue throughout the upcoming school year. In the mean time, there are six more days of Olympic action to take in. GAME ON!

 

The elephant in the room

9 Jul

If you’ve have been following this blog, you may have noticed a big elephant in the room. AbeSquare is intended to be a place where you can drop in and check out all that is happening at LMU. It’s meant to be less formal than a press release, kind of a look behind the scenes on what is happing at the University.

So if this blog is going to live up to its intention, it is time to address the elephant in the blogsphere. That elephant is the John J. Duncan School of Law and its bid to gain provisional accreditation by the American Bar Association. It’s a topic that has been a hot button in certain circles on campus for much of the last year. For me personally, it has been a tightrope I’ve tried to inch across by doing what is best for the University. Aside from the storm damage in Harrogate, it was probably the biggest story for LMU last week.

To step back a little and provide a little background, LMU’s journey to ABA accreditation began in early 2008 when the University took over the lease of the Old City Hall building in downtown Knoxville. Shortly after the lease signing, LMU Trustees announced its plans to found a law school. Initial planning and a feasibility study were performed. In August of the same year, a founding Dean, Sydney A. Beckman, was hired and faculty began to come on board.

All the while, the administration of the new law school was working with the goal that the school would eventually be ABA accredited. However, there were more important steps in their path. First, the University had to gain Tennessee Board of Law Examiners and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges approval to start to recruit students. After both bodies gave the okay, LMU announced that it was naming its newest professional studies school after Tennessee Congressman John J. Duncan, Jr., a long time public servant and supporter of LMU. Recruiting the first class was already underway and the Lincoln Memorial University-Duncan School of Law (LMU-DSOL) was just months away from opening its doors.

In August of 2009, LMU-DSOL’s inaugural class was seated and sworn in as first year law students. The University could not even apply for ABA accreditation until their first year of study was complete. So the next year was spent recruiting a full-time cohort to join the part-time students in the second year of operation. All the while, LMU’s administration was preparing for applicant status with the ABA.

As soon as it was eligible, LMU-DSOL applied for and gained applicant status with the ABA. This step, set LMU on the nearly two years and counting odyssey that has resulted in Thursday’s announcement by the ABA that LMU-DSOL has been denied provisional accreditation. The news came after LMU appealed the ABA’s initial denial in December and after LMU filed a lawsuit against the ABA.

LMU administrators are actually in a meeting now as I type this, determining the next steps the University will take.

So here it is, the elephant in the room. LMU-DSOL has been denied provisional accreditation by the ABA. While there is not a lot of inside scoop or behind-the-scenes information I can share right now, I can assure you that LMU still intends to have an ABA accredited law school and we are going to keep fighting the good fight until we reach our goal.

 

 

 

 

Coming Soon: LMU Honors College

5 Jul

In November Lincoln Memorial University announced that it was developing an honors scholars program that would begin in the Fall of 2012. Now, that program is just weeks away from getting underway with several returning students joining a group of incoming freshmen for the launch.

The academic program for gifted students includes honors courses, an honors thesis project with faculty mentor and learning through service. The scholars program is meant to be the first step to a full-blown honors college at LMU.

The program, which is aimed at providing deeper and broader learning opportunities, will launch in August. The program will have a limited enrollment and will require students to maintain semester and cumulative grade point averages of 3.0 or higher with no honors course grade lower than a “C.” Dr. Amiel Jarstfer, dean of the Paul V. Hamilton School of Arts and Science, is the architect behind the project, which he has been developing since he joined the University in 2010. The program will be founded with a select group of current undergraduate students who will be grandfathered into the program with a crop of incoming students.

The program will enhance participants’ professional and graduate school applications and provide preferential applicant status for graduates who choose to pursue their career paths at any of LMU’s post- baccalaureate degree programs, including the LMU-DeBusk  College of Osteopathic Medicine or LMU-Duncan School of Law. Additionally, LMU will designate Honors Housing for residential students in the program to help create an atmosphere conducive to collaborative learning.

The program requires scholars to complete an honors core that includes 100, 200, 300, 400 and 499 courses; complete a total of 26 honors program approved courses; complete a minimum of one honors course per year; complete one honors service-learning experience per year; participate in one honors program social event per semester and complete the honors thesis project and defense before a student and faculty panel.

Faculty mentorship will also play a role in the program. This will take place through collaboration in the thesis project, additional instructional and tutorial time as well as research opportunities. Honors courses will be taught exclusively by faculty members in their specialty.

It’s just another step in LMU’s goal to raise the academic bar for its students.

 

 

 

Taking Homecoming on the Road: Duncan School of Law

1 Oct

LMU Homecoming 2011: Celebrating Our Creative Legacy

Homecoming officially kicks-off on LMU’s main campus in Harrogate, Tenn., in 13 days. The annual event got underway ahead of schedule last evening with what is sure to become a new tradition – Homecoming events at extended learning sites. Director of Alumni Services Donnie Lipscomb teamed with LMU’s Women of Service to host a Homecoming gathering at the Duncan School of Law. Congressman Jimmy Duncan was also on hand and sponsored the food at the event.

After a week of mid-term exams, a celebration was in order.

Students at DSOL spent the week taking exams, including their final mid-term which took place immediately prior to the Friday night barbeque. Once the final exam was submitted, the students were greeted with hot dogs, beans, potato salad, chili and a sea of desserts.  Additionally, a corn hole tournament was held and door prizes given out.

Congressman Jimmy Duncan shared stories from his early law career.

DSOL Dean and Vice President Sydney A. Beckman kicked off the event and invited Congressman Duncan to speak. The Congressman chatted with students throughout the event and shared a few stories from his legal career before congress with the group. Students, faculty, staff and their families all joined in the fun.

As we continue to take Homecoming on the road, our next stop will be LMU-Cedar Bluff on Tuesday.

More photos from the event:

 

Congressman Duncan greets DSOL students at the Homecoming gathering. The gathering was a family event.

 

DSOL student leaders Kyle Vaughan and Matt Ooten.

 

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A day of days for the Duncan School of Law

6 Sep


And with that, the Tennessee Supreme Court was in session at the LMU-Duncan School of Law. What an exciting time for LMU’s young law school. For the roughly 200 students, it was an opportunity to see the state’s highest court in action; for Dean Sydney A. Beckman, his faculty and the administration of LMU, it was a watershed moment in the institution’s lifespan.

 

LMU Chairman Pete DeBusk and LMU-DSOL Dean Sydney A. Beckman take in the action just prior to the Supreme Court proceedings.

When Beckman and company set out to build a law school at LMU, chief among their goals was to harness technology to enhance a student’s experience. They wanted to employ faculty who had practice experience and could offer advice from the life lessons they had learned in their careers. They wanted to provide their students with mentors, as well as teachers, and make sure access was never an issue. They sought to build a facility that could and would host even the state’s highest court so students could observe the law in action.

Last Wednesday, as Justice Sharon G. Lee, Justice Gary R. Wade, Chief Justice Cornelia A. Clark, Justice Janice M. Holder and Justice William C. Koch entered DSOL’s courtroom to the sound of a gavel striking the bench, I could not help but feel a swell of pride for the school, its students, faculty and Dean Beckman.

 

James Alexander of the Old City Hall Partnership, Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) President Nancy B. Moody and Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam sign lease agreements to allow LMU to occupy the Old City Hall Building in Knoxville while LMU Board Chairman Autry O.V. “Pete” DeBusk looks on.

Sitting in the very same room that had hosted the lease signing in February of 2008 it’s impossible to quantify just how much has changed in “Old City Hall.” Back then, LMU was still developing plans for the facility that “might” include a possible school of law. Soon after the lease signing, LMU notified the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the Tennessee Board of Law Examiners of its intent to pursue a jurisprudence degree. Dean Beckman, hadn’t made his first visit to Knoxville yet and was still a faculty member at the Charleston School of Law. He would join LMU in July of 2008. To think of all the man hours that have been spent to get that “possible law school” to the point where it would host the state’s highest court is staggering.

Beyond the pride in how far we’ve come, Wednesday was a celebration of the potential of what is yet to come. As the overflow crowd gathered to hear oral arguments presented in three cases, including a death penalty appeal, it isn’t hard to imagine that some students might one day present their own arguments before the Tennessee Supreme Court. Likewise, it isn’t a far stretch to envision other judges and area courts presiding over the bench in the LMU-DSOL courtroom.