Tag Archives: Medical Technology

ROTC service & scholarship

19 Sep

At LMU, there is a long history of military service. In fact, as the United States was preparing to enter World War II, LMU was preparing pilots to enlist as an official training ground for the U.S. Army. The official presence of a military branch on campus has come and gown over time, but in the last five years, a resurgence is underway.

LMU’s U.S. Army Reserved Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) resurfaced on campus through a partnership with the Carson-Newman ROTC program. The program reached a milestone last week as it awarded its first Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty (GRFD) Scholarship to junior Christina Dudash. Dudash is studying medical technology. She has been involved in the ROTC program since she started at LMU.

GRFD scholarships are available through the U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) for students that desire to participate in the Senior ROTC program. These scholarships guarantee that the student once graduated from school and commissioned in the U.S. Army must serve their obligation in the USAR or Army National Guard. The scholarships provide for two years of benefits. To be eligible for the scholarship, students must have exactly two years of school remaining. With the tightening of budgets and limited available funds, the scholarships are very competitive.

The GRFS scholarships cover tuition and board up to $20,000 a year. They also include funding for books and a monthly stipend. Students are selected based on grade point average, standing in ROTC program, major and grade point average in military science class as well as Army Physical Fitness Test scores.

Military Science courses are open to all students. However, to enroll in advanced ROTC courses which lead to a commission as a Second Lieutenant, a student must meet US Army administrative, physical, medical and mental standards and be accepted by the Professor of Military Science. The LMU program is tied to the Carson-Newman ROTC program. Many of the advanced lab and train programs are done jointly

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We’re #2!

18 Aug

During the last test cycle (April to June 2011) for the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) Board Certification (BOC) 92 universities had medical technology graduates take the exam. Guess where the LMU program was ranked among the 92? Well, if you read the headline you already know the answer to the question so it’s not much of a game. But nevertheless, the Lincoln Memorial University Medical Technology graduates tied for the second highest pass rate in terms of highest composite score. Yep WE’RE #2!! And that is not #2 in the region or #2 in Tennessee; that is #2 in all of the U.S. of A!

Even more impressive is the fact that the LMU Medical Technology Program has had a 100% pass rate on the ASCP BOC dating back to 2005. If you’re math-challenged, that is six straight years of perfect pass rates.

The Class of 2011 composite class average of 648 bested the national average of 408 by 140 points. A minimum of 400 points is needed to pass the exam. The highest score recorded by a member of the LMU Class of 2011 was 748, a new program record.

LMU Medical Technology Class of 2011 Front row (L-R): Selena Long, Shasta Stewart, Jessica Colont, Adam Price and Derek Richards. Back row (L-R): Dr. Mark Camblin, adjunct faculty member in the LMU Medical Technology Program, Kenny Nicley, Brittany Cox, Breanna Felton, Dr. Bill Engle, director of the LMU Medical Technology Program and Steve Edwards, clinical supervisor of the LMU Medical Technology program.

So sure, the Class of 2011 did really good on this test, but I’m sure some of you are wondering, what is medical technology? And what do you do with a medical technology degree? A medical technology degree will prepare you for a career as a clinical laboratory scientist performing and interpreting a wide variety of tests–from simple blood glucose checks to more complex analysis necessary for diagnosing and treating pathological states.  Still not sure what I’m talking about? Think of any medical drama on TV when an attending tells a resident to run another panel or asks for pathology results or looks at a patient’s chart for a nutrient level. In the real world, those findings come from a lab which is run by medical technology graduates.

 

LMU Medical Technology Graduate and third year osteopathic medical student Souleymane Diallo.

Not all med tech grads end up in the lab. The Medical Technology Program is one program within LMU’s Division of Health Sciences and is one of many health professions programs at LMU aimed at easing the looming medical crisis in Appalachia’s medically underserved region. The curriculum of a medical technology program prepares its graduates for the rigors of post graduate medical education including medical school or physician assistant programs. The program also serves as a feeder of sorts for the LMU-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine and the LMU-DCOM Physician Assistant program. Several LMU Med Tech graduates are currently pursuing advanced degrees in both programs. For example, Souleymane Diallo, a 2009 graduate, is currently a third-year osteopathic medical student at LMU-DCOM.  While at LMU-DCOM he has picked up back-to-back student of the year awards.

 

 I have already covered the outstanding job prospects for physician assistant graduates (https://abesquare.wordpress.com/2011/07/29/degree-job-there-is-no-sure-bet-but-this-one-is-close). Medical technology graduates can expect similar opportunities. Though the shortage of trained and qualified laboratory technologists and technicians can put patients’ lives at risk just like the shortages of primary care physicians and nurses, it has not gained as much attention. In the state of Tennessee, LMU is just one of only five accredited medical technology programs. LMU Program Director Bill Engle said that lab managers in the region rely on LMU graduates to staff their labs and that graduates have as many as six job offers before and immediately following graduation.

Did I mention that LMU has an excellent Medical Technology Program?