Tag Archives: Philanthropy

Where do campus buildings get their names?

29 Aug

What’s in a name?

IMG_3064            If you have been in The Village on LMU’s campus in the past week, you have probably noticed a change.  The two newest residence halls, formerly referred to as DB3 and DB4, now have names.  Many students are aware that the other residence halls in The Village are either named after alumni donors (Shelton and Langley) or former university presidents (Burchett and McClelland).  Now that DB3 and DB4 have been named, there is a great deal of curiosity surrounding the origination of these names. However, there is no real mystery here as these two are also named for donors and a former president.IMG_3061

Norton Hall, formerly known as DB3, is named after a residence hall that once stood near the main entrance of campus, across from LP Hall.  The original Norton Hall was built in 1912. The construction was made possible through a generous contribution from Mary and Ella Norton of Norwich, Connecticut. The sisters honored their father’s lifelong commitment to philanthropy through their support of LMU and many other organizations. Many LMU alumni made great memories in this dorm, as it also contained a kitchen and dining hall.  In 1923 and 1924, Norton Hall served as an infirmary during a typhoid epidemic.  Now, many more memories will be made in the new Norton Hall.

 

Dr. Martin Peters participating in commencement exercises.

Dr. Martin Peters participating in commencement exercises.

DB4 is now named Peters Hall after Dr. Ralph Martin Peters and his wife, Lorraine Daniel Peters.  Dr. Peters completed his undergraduate degree at Lincoln Memorial University.  He was a member of both the baseball and basketball teams during this time.  After completing his master’s and doctorate degree at the University of Tennessee, he returned to LMU to serve as the director of admissions and alumni services.  He was also a professor of education and chair of the Department of Education.  He later served several positions at Tennessee Technological University.  In 1992, he returned to LMU as a professor of graduate education.  He then served as interim president and a member of the LMU Board of Trustees.  He has been honored as a member of both the LMU Educators’ Hall of Fame and the LMU Athletes’ Hall of Fame.  Lorraine Daniel Peters also earned a bachelor’s degree from LMU.  She then earned a master’s degree from Tennessee Tech, where she taught for 29 years.

Dr. Martin Peters and Cynthia Whitt award the R. Martin Peters Young Alumnae of the Year award  during homecoming in 2006.

Dr. Martin Peters and Cynthia Whitt award the R. Martin Peters Young Alumnae of the Year award during homecoming in 2006.

The Peters legacy lives on as the R. Martin Peters Young Alumnus of the Year Award, the Martin and Lorraine Peters Endowed Scholarship and the Lorraine D. Peters Endowed Nursing Scholarship are awarded each year. The R. Martin Peters Young Alumnus of the Year Award is awarded at the Alumni Banquet during homecoming to an individual who embodies his ideals. Additionally the Martin Peters Endowed Fund for Athletics exists to fund scholarships and other athletic needs.

Both residence halls will be formally dedicated during the 2014 Homecoming activities October 9-11.

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When a gift is more than a gift…

2 Oct

LMU_WordmarkWhen I arrived on campus at LMU eight years ago it wasn’t my first foray into life and work in academia. As I may have mentioned before, I spent two years in media relations at the University of Tennessee working for Lady Vol Athletics. Before that, there was the four years I spent as a student at St. Bonaventure University. Schools big or small; public or private; religiously affiliated or lay; vary greatly in size, structure and scope of their staff and administration. I have observed in every stop of my journey that public relations, media relations and marketing vary greatly depending on that structure.

Here at LMU, PR and Marketing is part of University Advancement. In my previous stops PR was grouped with communications as its own division. I will admit there it was an adjustment for me. I had to change my mindset slightly. Where I was used to focusing my attention on media relations and publicity above and beyond anything else, in University Advancement donor relations take precedent. Yes, a positive public image is always an end goal, but how our messaging will impact donors should also be considered. Even as a student, receiving donor-funded scholarships I had never considered a donors role at an institution.

Yesterday was designated as a Day of Giving at LMU. The day was set aside by President Dawson to encourage giving to LMU. Coming about a month ahead of National Philanthropy day, our goal was to encourage giving and make students, faculty and staff aware of how giving impacts everyone at LMU. It is easy to look at the rapid growth the University has experienced over the last decade and see the physical impact of large gifts to the University. There are Pope, Mitchell, Dishner, Langley, Shelton and Burchett residence halls. All of the new residence halls were built with funds from generous donors. Not to mention the new academic buildings or renovation and revitalization of some of our most storied structures.

What you can’t always see is how gifts large and small have indirect impacts for the University. I give through payroll deduction. My monthly gift of $20 comes out of my paycheck and I don’t even miss it. That is $240 for the year, not a huge donation or commitment on my part. One might argue it is like taking a decrease in pay, but I know that gift makes a difference. Not only can LMU put my $20 a month in to the annual fund, they also can count me in the employee giving rate. In fact, the division of University Advancement has a 100% giving rate. That means everyone in our division makes at least one gift in a year.

LMU was also named an Up-and-Coming institution in the South.

LMU was also named an Up-and-Coming institution in the South.

Giving rates are tools that grant funders, foundations and philanthropists often request when deciding what organizations that they will support. The rate at which employees and alumni giving paint a powerful picture of the support an institution enjoys. The great thing about giving rates is that is a calculation of participation. Whether you give $1, $240 or $1,000 you are counted.

Giving rates also have an effect on rankings and recognition for a school. In the latest US News and World Report college rankings LMU made gains in its ranking on the Regional Universities list, moving from No. 80 to No. 66. One of the categories looked at in compiling that list is giving rates.

I support LMU because I believe in its mission. I believe that education at every level improves a person’s quality of life and I believe that LMU is making lives better by providing educational opportunities in Appalachia and beyond. And I believe that my $20 a month makes a difference for LMU. I see it every day and I challenge you to consider matching my gift with a gift of your own. It doesn’t have to be made monthly and it doesn’t have to be more than $1, but think of the good we could do if every person who reads this entry gave to LMU.

Recipients of donor-funded scholarships pose for a photo during the LMU Day of Giving activities.

Recipients of donor-funded scholarships pose for a photo during the LMU Day of Giving activities.